Geometry Lesson

We've been servicing events for the past five years, and there are a few things that we've learned along the way that we think are important in terms of considering venue geometry and logistics, particularly in the Covid chapter of the Anthropocene Era. (The Anthropocene being the era in which humans have lived.)


Event geometry is not just how the space is arranged, but also how event producers conduct the flow of the event in that space.


Evaluating the venue geometry requires that an event planner diagram the expected flow of traffic during the event. This also involves organizing the entry and exit points to the event in a manner consistent with social distancing requirements, especially if there are areas where people have to form queues.


Part of this process requires creating maps for designated trash collection points (and really thinking through where people would need to discard their trash), food and bar distribution, bathroom access, and sitting areas. Also consider mapping where heat lamps might be required for outdoor areas.

Signage needs have to be determined as well as social distancing lines or checkpoints for queueing areas. Signage should also limit the number of people allowed at any one time in specified areas such as elevators and restrooms. Capacities are usually determined by local rules and regulations.

When evaluating venue geometry, it should be decided how to configure a video conference/live audience if it is a hybrid event like they have at many business meetings or conferences. It is also a good idea to block off rows of seats or sections to further maintain social distancing. If possible, offer staggered attendance times as well. Moreover, consider installing plexiglass barriers, where possible, between guests, staff, and/or tables―especially if social distancing is not reasonable or possible.


One other thing of note is to figure out where to put supplies: cleaning supplies, food supplies, bathroom and bar restocking supplies.... Often we are called to clean events but the host has not thought through where to put our brooms and mops and vacuums. A designated area out of the way of the guests is an important practical consideration.


If you found this helpful and need further consulting for your event, contact us today or download our white paper here.








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